*
 Master Of Kung Fu, by Doug Moench, Paul Gulacy, Mike Zeck, Dan Day, Jim Starlin et al, c.1983  "The last of the idiosyncratic, writer-driven exploitation comics from Marvel’s chaotic mid-70s heyday, Master Of Kung Fu had long overcome its original one-note limitations to become a thoroughly ambitious and markedly individual comicbook. Originally a mash-up of cliches associated with Bruce Lee films and Fu Manchu novels, it survived through the dedicated efforts of writer Moench and a sequence of inspired artists, most of whom proved willing to go above and beyond the call of duty on the title. With a string of influences from Bond to Groucho spicing up the book’s original premise, it serves as perhaps the best example from the period of how no starting point is too stereotypical or apparently limited to prove worthwhile in the right hands. Doomed never to be reprinted because of the lapsing of the rights to Sax Rohmer’s characters, Master Of Kung-Fu sadly seems likely to fade even more quickly from the popular memory than its fellow titles of the period".

 Master Of Kung Fu, by Doug Moench, Paul Gulacy, Mike Zeck, Dan Day, Jim Starlin et al, c.1983 

"The last of the idiosyncratic, writer-driven exploitation comics from Marvel’s chaotic mid-70s heyday, Master Of Kung Fu had long overcome its original one-note limitations to become a thoroughly ambitious and markedly individual comicbook. Originally a mash-up of cliches associated with Bruce Lee films and Fu Manchu novels, it survived through the dedicated efforts of writer Moench and a sequence of inspired artists, most of whom proved willing to go above and beyond the call of duty on the title. With a string of influences from Bond to Groucho spicing up the book’s original premise, it serves as perhaps the best example from the period of how no starting point is too stereotypical or apparently limited to prove worthwhile in the right hands. Doomed never to be reprinted because of the lapsing of the rights to Sax Rohmer’s characters, Master Of Kung-Fu sadly seems likely to fade even more quickly from the popular memory than its fellow titles of the period".

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